Sign In
Not register? Register Now!
Essay Available:
You are here: HomeEssaySocial Sciences
Pages:
8 pages/≈2200 words
Sources:
Level:
APA
Subject:
Social Sciences
Type:
Essay
Language:
English (U.S.)
Document:
MS Word
Date:
Total cost:
$ 32.4
Topic:

Theories of Global Society (Essay Sample)

Instructions:

World affairs Topic Theories of Global Society Paper details This is Midterm exam paper. The professor uses Turnitin Program to catch plagiarism and any cheatings. Please leave sources. Don\'t change any Size and Margins. I will provide class materials, Please see that and write paper base on the mataerials. You need to answer 2 questions. One of the following questions and one essential question. Also, each question should have at least 3 seperate citations.

source..
Content:
Name
Instructor
Course
Date
Theories of Global Society
Introduction
This paper evaluates the concepts characterizing global society. Global society has been conceptualized in different, but also competing measures. In the first section, the definition of global society is evaluated. Two definitions of global society (Immanuel Wallerstein's and Gidden's) are evaluated in the first part. This section also illuminates how these definitions have shaped my understanding oft the term global society. The second part discusses the concept of transformation and its relevance to global society.
Question Two
Globalization and the global society have been defined differently by various authors. For instance Immanuel Wallerstein conceptualizes the world in terms of systems the development of global capitalism. According to this view, division between social, political and economic relationships is seen as artificial. Wallerstein sees globalization as the emergence of a unified world system that is characterized by socioeconomic relationships of capitalism (Shaw 1). This definition has in the recent past been extended in the cultural dimension of the global system in which Wallerstein sees it as being dominated by stretches between universalism and particularism (sexism and racism).
On the other hand, Gidden's sees the current global society as being dominated by knowledge based abstract systems, which dictate human activity, but at the same time enable or constrain one's actions and choices (Shaw 1). Gidden's perception dissociates itself from the notion that increasing integration of systems leads to greater social integration on the international scale. Gidden's definition thus indicates that the crises that stem from the failures and contradictions of the so called abstract systems are lead to greater problems of social integration (Sanjay 2).
In line with this, it is essential to view globalization on the account of system and social integration. Global society is a manifestation of increasing system integration at the social-economic relations, as well as, the development of political and cultural institutions. The current global society is fragmented by a host of fractures: class, income and wealth, knowledge and power, culture and lifestyle, gender, nation, ethnicity and race. Even as the world continues to become a global community, there are many obstacles to social integration, which are hard to categorize. This begs the question that should the concept of global society be perceived on the account of factual and not normative sense? In real sense, it is impractical to dissociate the two aspects. This is because even the complex global market relations, as well as, global coordination of production yield common expectations and ideas of social life. In fact, the coordination of communications permits the diffusion of ideas and values which in the long run become increasingly held. In addition, the emergence of global politics is a result of the diffusion of language, ideas and values (Sterling-Folker 13).
Having observed these two schools of thought, a global society can be termed as the entire complex of social relations of all humans on the global stage. Global society is not only self-sufficient, but also complete just like any other society. It is a representation of a partial abstraction relative to the natural living world and history of mankind. The current global society does not have needs, is not based on imperatives, and should not be seen to entail a given set of institutions and functions rather. The institutions, systems and social relations characterizing the global society, as well as, its emergence, must be described in the context of historical contingency and discontinuity (Sterling-Folker 13).
Global society, when observed from a sociological perspective, is seen to have social relations, but it is essential to note that not all those social relations are defined at the global stage. In addition, global society is regarded as the largest society or context of social relations. For a global society to exist, it is important for the established global social relations to be strong (Sterling-Folker 13).
The explanation given by Giddens and Wallerstein have shaped the way I perceived global society. Initially, I thought that a global society was a collection of people with shared interest, beliefs and aspirations. I thought that a global society has a single political order and that there are no barriers limiting people's associations from across the globe.
However, the two theories described in this paper have broadened my understanding of the term global society. First, I have learnt from Wallerstein's definition that globalization is the emergence of a unified world system that is characterized by socioeconomic relationships of capitalism. Wallerstein's definition has in the recent past been extended in the cultural dimension of the global system in which Wallerstein sees it as being dominated by stretches between universalism and particularism (sexism and racism). It is clear from the current global era that sexism and racism are prevalent. These are aspects of capitalism: those who propagate it use sexism and racism to drive their agendas. While the initial understanding of the term society entails a collection of people with common belief and customs, it is apparent that capitalists do not give a damn of social principles of society. All they need to achieve is success of their agenda under all costs; they take advantage of the global era to achieve their goals.
Giddens perceptive is the best definition. Giddens sees the current global society as being dominated by knowledge based abstract systems, which dictate human activity, but at the same time enable or constrain one's actions and choices. Gidden's perception dissociates itself from the notion that increasing integration of systems leads to greater social integration on the international scale. Gidden's definition view's globalization on the account of system and social integration. Global society is a manifestation of increasing system integration at the social-economic relations, as well as, the development of political and cultural institutions. The current global society is fragmented by a host of fractures: class, income and wealth, knowledge and power, culture and lifestyle, gender, nation, ethnicity and race. This is evident in the current era. Globalization has led to the emergence of social classes. The rich are becoming richer and richer while the poor are getting poorer. Political powerhouses are dictating the global political order at the expense of weaker nations.
In summary, this discussion has evaluated two definitions of global society: Gidden's and Wallerstein's. Having observed these two schools of thought, a global society can be termed as the entire complex of social relations of all humans on the global stage. Global society is not only self-sufficient, but also complete just like any other society. Gidden's exaplanation is better than Wallerstein's. Gidden's definition view's globalization on the account of system and social integration. The current global society is fragmented by a host of fractures: class, income and wealth, knowledge and power, culture and lifestyle, gender, nation, ethnicity and race. This is evident in the current era. Rich nations continue to dictate the political and economic order on the global stage. Wealth and class define the social order. These definitions have broadened my understanding of the term global society.
Works Cited
Sanjay, Seth. Post-Colonial Theory and International Relations. London; Routledge. Print.
Shaw, Martin. Global Society and International Relations. Martin Shaw, 2000. Print.
Sterling-Folker, Jennifer. Realistic Approaches. Chapter 2. Print.
Question three
In the broadest sense, global society describes the state of the society in the modern age of globalization. In essence, this stems from international integration following interchange of world views, aspects of culture, ideas and products. There are various concepts that describe the concept of globalization and global society as a whole. Transformation is on the forefront of all concepts as it embodies the whole aspect of global society. Transformation is strongly linked to modernism, whereby global society is realizing advancements in virtually all aspects. At the turn of the 20th C, the world started becoming a global society. Initial barriers that had divided the world into various regions started to disintegrate. To begin with, there was a comprehensive advancement in social connections something that was unattainable in the yester centuries. Secondly, in the current era, the world has a global economic system whereby production and markets are dictated on the global scale (Fulcher 421). In addition, there are evident elements of a global culture and worldwide communications, vibrant global political ideologies, as well as, a possibility of global political action. There are international institutions that are dedicating the world order unlike in the Cold War era.
The current trending aspect of globalization on the account of transformation is the decline of nation-state. Nation-state was anchored on the notion that its citizens are within a defined territory, which has its own rules and regulations. The idea of nation-state meant that there was a unified administration that maintained order, collected taxes, and executed laws made by the national government (Fulcher 421). In addition, national governments supposedly act as representatives of their citizens on the international stage anchored on the sovereignty of the nation-state. Thanks to globalization, nation-state is fast losing its autonomy and control. It has become apparent that globalization in its various dimensions undermines the concept of nation-state and consequentl...
Get the Whole Paper!
Not exactly what you need?
Do you need a custom essay? Order right now:

Other Topics:

  • Descartes Discourse on the Method
    Description: Descartes' Discourse on the Method Social Sciences Essay...
    3 pages/≈825 words| APA | Social Sciences | Essay |
  • Human Development and Maturity in an Organization
    Description: Human Development and Maturity in an Organization Social Sciences Essay...
    4 pages/≈1100 words| APA | Social Sciences | Essay |
  • Police Discretion
    Description: The role of the police is to maintain law and order in the society Social Sciences Essay...
    4 pages/≈1100 words| APA | Social Sciences | Essay |
Need a Custom Essay Written?
First time 15% Discount!