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Transfer Repot/methodology Thesis (Essay Sample)

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The historical unfolding of art seems to be one of the most complex processes imaginable. Crucially dependent on cultural, technical, societal and political circumstances, not to mention the ever present subjective factor, this process is quite unpredictable, but at the same time far from chaotic. That there is certain regularity in it is testified by the very history of art, which, as a discipline, is traditionally based upon the notions of style and movement, notions which represent the most widely recognized ways of systematization in historical considerations of art and which introduce an element of order into it. Architecture seems to be especially convenient for such systematization, probably because of its already inherent rationality. From Hegel to Sigfried Giedeon to Colin Rowe and others, there have been more than a few attempts to surpass purely stylistic classifications and to try to find more comprehensive ones.

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Transfer Repot/methodology Thesis
Overview
The historical unfolding of art seems to be one of the most complex processes imaginable. Crucially dependent on cultural, technical, societal and political circumstances, not to mention the ever present subjective factor, this process is quite unpredictable, but at the same time far from chaotic. That there is certain regularity in it is testified by the very history of art, which, as a discipline, is traditionally based upon the notions of style and movement, notions which represent the most widely recognized ways of systematization in historical considerations of art and which introduce an element of order into it. Architecture seems to be especially convenient for such systematization, probably because of its already inherent rationality. From Hegel to Sigfried Giedeon to Colin Rowe and others, there have been more than a few attempts to surpass purely stylistic classifications and to try to find more comprehensive ones. Allegiance to one's country has roots in the social psychology of humankind. According to David A. Butz, “primitive forms of national attachment, such as attachment to tribes, chiefdoms, or  states, may have existed even thousands of years prior to the first documentation of modern forms of national attachment."[3] Part of this attachment to the nation is the common understanding of the symbols of that nation. Butz continues by noting that " . . . national symbols often do not only represent the general concept 'nation,' but also condense the knowledge, values, history, and memories associated with one's nation. Further, it is clear that national symbols also hold the potential to represent the strong emotional attachments felt for one's nation. People often identify more strongly with their nation, and their fellow citizens, when exposed to symbols of their nation. Similarly, Karen A. Cerulo notes that national symbols are used "to direct public attention, integrate citizens, and motivate public action" and in "creating bonds and reinforcing goals among . . . citizens." National symbols are so strong that they "clarify and create society."Yet, Cerulo notes that the type of symbol used can fluctuate based on the history and culture of the country and the needs of the national leaders. In other words, although every nation in the world has its symbols, the structure, function, and style of the symbol may vary across nations. The researcher’s intention is to investigate the hormonology of tangible and intangible meaning and emotional attachments of national symbols through the eyes of diverse Jordanian communities both in the past and the present. Significant matters were found for identification with the current Jordanian symbols Jordanian Community is becoming more hybrids. It is concluded that the role of national symbols might need to be more representative of all population groups, provinces and regions. This research proposes a hypothesis based on qualitative data from narratives and beliefs of different Jordanians across the country and will be proposed with tolerances of cultural visuals. Edmonds (1998) says that complexity is “...the difficulty associated with a model’s form given almost complete information about the data it formulates.”Architecture was perhaps the first human activity to develop the concepts of model or design, due to the need to articulate large structures conceived by one man, but realized with the help of many others. This requires the final result to be more or less completely defined before any construction is begun, and then to be somehow presented to those who are actually to do the work. The design according to which something has to be built must describe the form in terms of a precise geometry and need not be necessarily connected to aesthetic considerations. Moreover, this geometrical definition must correspond with the building technique which is in use.  The main existing challenge for the researcher is to construct a new sense of visual identity from a complex situation, creating a new understanding of symbol and important avenue for directing meaningful and effective visual communication.
Theories
Semiotics and semiology focus our attention on how people generate meanings--in their use of language, in their behaviour (body language, dress, facial expression, and so on), and in creative texts of all kinds. Everyone tries to make sense of human behaviour, in our everyday lives, in the novels we read, in the films and television shows we see, in the concerts we attend, in sports events we watch or participate in--humans are meaning-generating and meaning-interpreting animals, whatever else we are. We are always sending messages and always receiving and interpreting the messages others send us. What semiotics and semiology do is provide us with more refined and sophisticated ways of interpreting these messages-and of sending them. In particular, they provide us with methods of analyzing texts in cultures and cultures as texts.
Symbols in Saussure's System A symbol is a subcategory of a sign. It is a sign whose mean- ing is not completely arbitrary or conventional. Saussure (1966) explains: The word symbol has been used to designate the linguistic sign, or more specifically, what is here called the signifier. ...One charac- teristic of the symbol is that it is never wholly arbitrary; it is not empty, for there is the rudiment of a natural bond between the signifier and the signified. The symbol of justice, a pair of scales, could not be replaced by just any other symbol, such as a chariot. (p. 68)
Peirce sees the symbol as conventional, unlike the icon and index, which are not conventional in his view of things. What is important about symbols is that they stand for something, they convey meanings. These meanings are often connected to historical events, traditions, and so on. The symbol, generally an object or an image, because it can represent historical events, because it "contains" all kinds of extraneous matters connected to it, because it can be a repository of meanings, because it can have so many connotations, can become very important to people. Think of religious icons, for example. Carl Jung (1968) explains this matter in some detail in his book Man and His Symbols: Thus a word or an image is symbolic when it implies something more than its obvious and immediate meaning. It has a wider "unconscious" aspect that is never precisely defined or fully explained. Nor can one hope to define or explain it. As the mind explores the symbol, it is led to ideas that lie beyond the grasp of reason. (p. 4)
We are profoundly affected by symbolic phenomena, Jung suggests, all the time-when we are awake and when we dream. As Freud has pointed out, in our dreams we use the processes of symbolic condensation and displacement to disguise our real thoughts and desires and evade the dream censor. It would wake us up if it recognized the sexual content of our dreams, as mani- fested, for example, in phallic symbols and symbols of the female gen...
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