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Fiddler on the Roof (Essay Sample)

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The assignment requires an essay on the first musical theatre experience. I have decided to see the musical "Fiddler on the Roof" as my first musical theatre experience. This specific item that I am now seeing is a film that was adapted from a theater show that was very popular. Despite the fact that this film is in English, it may be difficult to comprehend some things that are spoken at times, particularly when it comes to how they pronounce one's name due of the Jewish accents. In this composition, Joseph Stein adapts a theatre play that he previously performed. Jerry Bock composed the music for the film. Sheldon Harnick wrote the words for this song. After premiering as a musical in 1965, it was made into a film in 1971. The musical "Fiddler on the Roof" was inspired by the tales of Sholom Aleichem.

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Fiddler on the Roof
Student’s Name
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Fiddler on the Roof
I have decided to see the musical "Fiddler on the Roof" as my first musical theatre experience. This specific item that I am now seeing is a film that was adapted from a theater show that was very popular. Despite the fact that this film is in English, it may be difficult to comprehend some things that are spoken at times, particularly when it comes to how they pronounce one's name due of the Jewish accents. In this composition, Joseph Stein adapts a theatre play that he previously performed. Jerry Bock composed the music for the film. Sheldon Harnick wrote the words for this song. After premiering as a musical in 1965, it was made into a film in 1971. The musical "Fiddler on the Roof" was inspired by the tales of Sholom Aleichem.
Norman Jewison is in charge of both the production and the direction of the picture. Jerome Robbins was responsible for the choreography. Harold Prince directed and produced this production on the New York stage. Tom Abbott worked on the adaptation for the big screen. The characters in the film are referred as as It is Tevye (played by Topol) who is the film's primary character. He is a poor milkman who seeks answers from God, and he is the father of five unmarried girls. Golde (Norma Crane) is Tevye's obstinate wife who refuses to give in. Motel (played by Leonard Frey) is a hardworking tailor who lives in poverty. It is Yente (played by Molly Picon) who is in charge of arranging marriages in the community. Lazar Wolf (played by Paul Mann) is a widowed butcher who is on the lookout for a companion. The character of Tzeitel (Rosalind Harris) is Tevye's daughter, who is over heels in love with Motel. Hodel (played by Michelle Marsh) is another of Tevye's daughters who falls in love with Perchik, and she is also portrayed by Michelle Marsh. Chava (Neva Small) is the third oldest daughter of Tevye, and she is the one who falls in love with Fyedka (played by Raymond Lovelock). Perchik (played by Michael Glaser) is a well-educated guy who takes on the responsibility of schooling Tevye's two young children, and he develops feelings for Hodel.
The story of "Fiddler in the Roof" takes place in the little Jewish town of Anatevka, Russia, during the reign of Tsar Nicholas II (which is rule under the Russian empire). There is no concern or anxiety among the residents of this hamlet about what is going on in the world outside them; instead, they are concerned with themselves and their neighbors in their village. Tevye is the film's primary character and narrator. The main character, Tevye, is a poor guy who works hard to provide for his family. When he is perplexed or disputing, he seems to look at things from both sides. Tevye often raises his eyes to the heavens, praying to God for assistance or solutions to his troubles. Towards the beginning of the film, we witness Tevye working and a Fiddler playing on a roof, which leads to the film's opening sequences. Tevye has five daughters, three of whom are of marriageable age: Tzeitel, Hodel, and Chava. Tevye is the father of five girls. Tevye is a man of tradition, and he follows the rules of the game to the letter. In this video, we witness him questioning his own ways of thinking and letting his daughters to chose their own partners, which leads to his altering his ways. It used to be that the father had to approve or pick the spouse for his daughter before they could tie the knot with him. Throughout the film, there are numerous distinct conflicts to be found. One such point of contention occurred when Tevye informed Lazar Wolf that he may marry his daughter Tzeitel. As a result, when Tevye informs his daughter of this, she expresses her displeasure by refusing to marry Lazar since she is over over heels in love with Motel. Tevye subsequently betrays his deal with Lazar and gives Motel his okay and acceptance to marry Tzeitel, so breaking his pact with Lazar. The fact that Tevye betrayed their agreement has made Lazar very sad since they were close friends and he had faith in him. Even on the night of Motel and Tzeitel's wedding, the tensions remain high. Lazar presents the two five chickens as a gift to Tevye, who then becomes irritated with him. On this wedding night, we observe a break from custom as Perchik has the entire men dance with all of the ladies in attendance. It has never happened like this before. At this point in the film, everyone is having a good time and dancing about. To convey a message to the villagers, the constable and his men demolish their wedding in order to give them a message that they must go because the Russians want the Jewish people to leave so that they may take over their lands and houses. Hodel wants to marry Perchik, and they seek Tevye's permission first. At first, he refuses, but they eventually convince him that they are not asking for his permission, but rather for his blessing rather than his approval. They inform him that, regardless of what he says, they will still get married to each other. Tevye finds himself in a position where he must choose between his traditional traditions and the happiness of his daughter Hodel. In spite of the fact that Perchik is not wealthy and has nothing to offer Tevye's daughter other than love, Tevye decides to give his support and blessing to his daughter and Perchik's marriage. As a result of their marriage, Perchik departs for a period of time, and Hodel follows, traveling thousands of miles away from her family, whom she is likely to never see or speak to again. At the conclusion of the film, his third daughter Chava expresses a desire to marry Fyedka, and despite the fact that they both warn him otherwise, he refuses to sanction the marriage. He even informs his daughter that if she continues to live with him, he would disown her. After a few days, the two are unable to be seen, and Tevye informs Golde that his daughter Chava has died in their eyes and that she no longer lives. At the conclusion of this film, all of the villagers are relocating to various parts of the globe and abandoning their ancestral homesteads in the process.
Tevye is bidding farewell to Tzeitel and Motel and wishes them happiness in Warsaw until they can go to the United States permanently. Chava comes to visit her family before they depart, and Tevye is completely oblivious to the fact that his daughter exists, despite her pleadings for him to acknowledge her. Even though Tevye does not say anything, her last words are a silent prayer, "God be with you!" which is heard by Tzeitel, who calls out to Chava as she is about to leave. Last but not least, Tevye and his wife are leaving their hamlet in search of a new one, and the fiddler is following them and playing at the same time as they do. Tevye has a feeling of optimism and pleasure for the future as a result of this.
The fiddle, which is a violin, is the most prominent musical instrument heard throughout the film. A piece of music is played before each song in this video in order to give you a heads-up that a musical composition is about to begin. Songs from this film, such as "If I were a Rich Man" and "Matchmaker, Matchmaker," are well-known around the world. Music that is mostly moderate and sluggish is heard throughout the film, although there are some quick pieces as well. It seems like almost every time someone is singing, they begin by simply discussing the words and then progressively sing the lyrics while they continue to speak. Some of the characters in the film seem to be appropriate for the roles that they play, but they do not appear to be able to sing the songs that they are performing. Throughout the film, we hear the song "Tradition," which has a great lot of significance. This song may be heard many times throughout the film. When the song "tradition" plays at the opening of the film, we get a glimpse of the people and their customs in the town of Anetevka as seen through the eyes of Tevye, the main character. The traditions of the villagers are very significant to them, and they never forget how much they mean to them. The music in this picture has a rich and complex feel. The music, which has been modified and performed by John Williams, is really fantastic.
This film was put together in a professional manner as a film. All of the characters are very significant to the story and contribute to the film's overall impact. Topol, the actor who portrayed Tevye in th

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