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Aristotle's Concept of Eudaimonia in the Nicomachean Ethics (Term Paper Sample)

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The Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is a compilation of the notes of Aristotle's students, and many scholars view it as the most significant work on ethics in western culture. The second edition of the book depicts revised transitions, editorial interventions and expanded note on Aristotle's concept of Eudaimonia. The argues that Eudaimonia or happiness is the activity of the rational soul and virtue is the excellent living of a human being in accordance to its natural kind . The essay paper, therefore, uses Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics to discuss Aristotle's concept of eudemonia, human functioning, and rational part of the soul. It also examines Aristotle's concept of habituation, character, virtue and explains the roles that the notion play in the achievement of Eudaimonia.

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Aristotle’s Concept of Eudaimonia in the Nicomachean Ethics
Introduction
The Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is a compilation of the notes of Aristotle's students, and many scholars view it as the most significant work on ethics in western culture. The second edition of the book depicts revised transitions, editorial interventions and expanded note on Aristotle's concept of Eudaimonia. The argues that Eudaimonia or happiness is the activity of the rational soul and virtue is the excellent living of a human being in accordance to its natural kind . The essay paper, therefore, uses Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics to discuss Aristotle’s concept of eudemonia, human functioning, and rational part of the soul. It also examines Aristotle’s concept of habituation, character, virtue and explains the roles that the notion play in the achievement of Eudaimonia.
Aristotle’s Conception of Eudaimonia
Hackett discusses Aristotle’s concept of Eudaimonia in the Nicomachean Ethics and argues that it is undertaking and living a satisfactory life that brings contentment. The implication of the author is that Eudaimonia includes motivation for excellence and virtuous activities. He notes that humans naturally strive for self-development, therefore, what brings about Eudaimonia is an effective development of human attitude and influences. Notably, the Eudaimonia of a human being is the attainment of excellence by the presentation of reason. In the view of Hackett, Aristotle’s concept of Eudaimonia makes it impossible for any person to isolate excellence. Therefore, achievements call for both social competence and high professional standards.
Aristotle’s Conceptions of the Human Function
Hackett asserts that Aristotle's concept of the human function is a rational activity which is performed according to its virtues (p.23). The metaphysics of Aristotle suggests that human function is a way of operation and it is different from purpose. Precisely, human beings undertake activities through rational choices, therefore, human good is a coherent action (Hackett 24).
Aristotle’s Conception of the Rational Part of the Soul
In the book titled Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Hackett explains Aristotle’s conception of the rational part of the soul (p.22). He highlights that the soul of a living thing is its ability to take part in activities which are connected to its natural kind. The functions are nourishment, growth, decay, intelligence, perception, movement and rest. Besides, the concept discusses three degrees of the soul which include sensitive, nutritive and rational soul. They belong to animals, plants and human beings respectively. Concerning the perspective of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, the soul is not an object, but it is inseparable from the body. Notably, the rational part of a soul is helpful in resonating the coherent principle of virtue (Hackett 25).
Aristotle’s Conception of Habituation, Character, and Virtue
Hackett explains Aristotle's concept of habituation, character, and virtue by asserting that a person can only be virtuous if he or she has a good character (p.23). In Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics there are many virtues, but only four of them are primary. They include justice, wisdom, temperance, and courage. Moreover, the book notes that habituation has a critical role in the development of character. For that reason, the introduction of habituation without a proper character cannot lead to the fulfillment of the potential of an individual. Likewise, the process of habituating an individual to virtue is a practical activity. Hackett argues that a person learns to virtuous by repeating actions which control desires and those that prompt the individual to operate in the opposite direction (p.29).
Explanation of the Roles that Aristotle’s Concepts Play in the Achievement of Eudaimonia
In the book titled Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, the first role of Aristotle’s concept of Eudemonia is to understand the way humans can live a good life in connection to its natural kind ( Hackett 27). In such a perspective, a good life is the one that exhibits the full potential of a human being. Similarly, virtue is significant for Eudaimonia, but it is not achievable without practical reason. Secondly, Aristotle's concept of Eudaimonia assists people to comprehend the importance of theoretical reason by helping individuals to contemplate the wonderful, best and most divine thing in the universe. Notably, passion, association, and body are features of human beings, but they are not dominant because virtues do not require external goods (Hackett 10).
Moreover, Aristotle’s concept of Eudaimonia helps philosophers to acknowledge that human good is about the excellent performance of a human function. The aspect is the activity of a unique portion of the human soul. The rational part of the soul has the role of demonstrating logics in that it has the capacity of listening, agreeing with or opposing a concept. Aristotle states that the third part of the soul is a calculative portion because its essential responsibility is deliberation. Notably, it is a specified form of reasoning that entails laying down of goals which an individual wishes, the most appropriate means of achieving a goal and the result to form the decision. A rational nature is expressive on the perspective of calculation and well-thought decisions. Moreover, perception allows a person to discriminate percentile qualities whereas reason is effective in the discrimination imperceptible pr...
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